The Top 5 Most Important Windows and Linux Sysadmin Tasks

Being a system administrator isn’t easy, and all of the tasks that you have to manage every single day is more than likely going to take a toll on you. If it hasn’t already it’s going to eventually, and if you’re a beginner system admin you’re going to notice that things can only get tougher from here. Your role is literally one of the most important roles (if not the most important one) that’s going to surround web hosting and VPS’s, and that’s why it’s so crucial that you understand your tasks. If you don’t know what you’re doing you’re going to affect more than just yourself or the extended circle you happen to have, people are usually relying on your servers to go about their business and downtime is only going to have them wonder why they’re still working with you. The most important tasks aren’t always going to be the easiest ones, but some of them are pretty simple and straight to the point. Many of these tasks are most importantly implemented on Cheap VPS & Cheapest Windows VPS hosting products as they are often the target of unwanted attention.

You can’t become a system admin if you aren’t competent enough to handle the most important tasks that need handling, and that’s one of the many reasons people find a different career choice. We’ll look at some of the most important traits that come alongside being a great system administrator, as well as what kinds of things you need to focus on when you want to be successful in this particular role. Failing to perfect the way you approach these tasks is going to leave you in a bad spot with your VPS or server in general, so take these words to heart and don’t be one of those lazy sysadmins. You have a role to fulfil and it’s your responsibility to do so, so make sure you’re always on top of your game. Here are the top 5 tasks (in my personal opinion) that hold the most merit as a system administrator:

Checking the system software – There needs to be checks every single morning regarding your system and the software running on it. Technology is one of those things that can easily mess about, so make sure everything is set in place before starting the working day.
Backup the data consistently – If there’s a big data scare and you lose a significant amount of data you’ll essentially be screwed, using back-ups is a great way to prevent problems like that (especially with Windows).

System tuning – A great sysadmin is going to understand the system completely, and that means being able to improve upon it in any way that they can (through the use of system tuning).
Keeping the network thriving and alive – Keeping the network up is an entire job in its own right, so of course as a system administrator you need to make sure you’re keeping the network in tact at all times.

Security – Security is going to be one of the largest component for your server (be it Linux or Windows), and that happens to fall under the system administrators duties as well.

Why Switch To SSD VPS Hosting

There are always going to be fads in society, no matter what you do there’s always going to be some sort of silly trend that you can’t comprehend no matter what (the perfect example I can think of would be bright pink mohawks in the early 2000’s); but what about VPS hosting? Technology plays a rather large role in how society operates now, but does that mean that there can potentially be fads and trends in the technological world? The answer is yes, but the fads most people get into are things that won’t stick around for a long time. VPS hosting is one of the most important things a system administrator has to hold themselves responsible for, it plays a part in so many different processes pertaining to the internet that those refusing to make use of one are going to feel the burn later on.

It’s a very popular trend now, but I wouldn’t call it a fad, and I’m (of course) talking about the use of SSD’s within Cheap VPS hosting. HDD’s were the common standard when it came to putting together a VPS before, but more and more people are deciding the switch to an SSD-based VPS system. The reasoning behind this is going to vary from person to person, but we all know how much faster an SSD-based VPS is going to be when you compare it to an HDD one. Controlling the amount of heat collecting in your datacenter is usually done with an air conditioner system or something, but not everybody is going to have that luxury (and I mean that in the nicest way possible!).

We can’t all afford to have a fancy HVAC system put into our workspace, so cutting down on heat can be important to some. SSD’s not only let off a lesser amount of heat than HDD’s, but they’re way faster as well. The faster your VPS, the faster your site is going to be, and we all know how much visitors love browsing a quickly loaded site. SSD’s are also for the energy-efficient type of person, so if you’re all about the trees and the birds (and the bees!) you’ve probably already taken it upon yourself to get onto the righteous path of using SSD’s.

SSD’s used to be incredibly expensive according to some peoples standards, but people are seeing the positive traits and believe that they outweigh the cost in this case. It’s hard to cut corners when you’re trying to build an efficient VPS for your website, and understanding how important a quality VPS can be isn’t that hard. Every single site that’s successful has a dedicated VPS behind it, and if it didn’t it probably wouldn’t have hit a home-run. SSD’s are converting people in a sense, but it’s nothing bad at all, to be honest I would call it an event that should have taken place a few years ago; I guess I was a bit ahead of my time.

Best Virtualization Technologies to Power Your Windows VPS

Hello all of my readers, it’s Garry Terrell here again and today we’re going to look deeper into the virtualization technologies that are used to power your Windows VPS. We’re going to compare the three virtual machine giants, and when you hear their names you’re probably going to let out a “oh no, not this again”. They’re also going to be compared to one another, so it’s something I might as well get out of the way early on in my blogging days. Hyper-V virtualization has gained a lot of praise, and it’s due to many different reasons, but it’s always been compared to the use of Xen and KVM virtualization. Depending on your operating system you’ll need to pick a hypervisor that’s going to work to your advantage in every which way possible, and that’s why the comparison of these three virtualization processes is a necessity. We’re going to walk you through each hypervisor a bit before we get into the actual comparison of them, so hopefully you can learn what they’re all about before getting down and dirty with the significant details.

KVM

KVM is a virtualization hypervisor that’s used with Linux operating systems, the coolest feature about this one is that it’s open source, meaning that the community following the software has the ability to improve upon it if they feel fit. There are tons of independent developers out there that are more than capable of implementing new features and such, and that’s just a portion of the excitement. A KVM Windows VPS is still something you can keep in mind, because it isn’t “limited” to being used on Linux systems, but it was initially developed to be used on them specifically. This is one of the more “mature” hypervisors you’ll come across, and it’s the most common one you’ll see when you’re looking at VPS servers.

Hyper-V

Hyper-V is the hypervisor that’s developed by Microsoft themselves. It’s a commercial standard hypervisor, and it’s not open source (so don’t get your hopes up when it comes to community developments, that’s something that won’t happen in this case). It’s made to be used with a Windows VPS (and most would claim that a KVM Windows VPS would be more ideal), but this particular hypervisor can be used with any supported operating system (which is any OS that the hardware is capable of supporting).

Xen

Open-source is always a great trait to have, because it means that the innovations are never going to stop coming. Xen is one of those “hip” virtualization projects that is dedicated to perfect the VPS and cloud server platforms they release. Multiple guest operating systems means that no matter your preference you’ll be able to make use of Xen. Both ClouStack and OpenStack can be used, and the technology implemented is known to be rather reliable.

The Details

Figuring out which one of these hypervisors is going to be best for your VPS isn’t going to take a lot of time, the reviews and features that are listed on the internet should give you a good idea as to which one you’ll be selecting. The modernized database center (or even cloud/hybrid cloud system) would make use of the Windows Hyper-V virtualization system with ease, because it offers flexibility and speed that most other hypervisors can’t keep up with. The only knock on this one would be the fact that it was “developed for Windows”, but that’s a pretty small negative trait to have.

KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) is a hypervisor that was developed with the use of Linux, and the ability to run many different VMs (virtual machines) at once makes it one of the more sought after hypervisors to make use of. A VPS is going to be running many different VMs at one time, so KVM is going to make the entire process a breeze (and we all know how frustrating dealing with problems in the datacenter can be). Every single virtual machine has access to its own privatized virtual hardware set-up, each equipped with the necessary hardware.

Xen would be ideal for those who are willing to be part of a “movement” regarding VPS servers, open-source technology would allow system administrators that like to tweak their hypervisors the ability to do so.

Windows 2008 or 2012 for Your Windows VPS

Having a VPS that’s worth its weight in gold is always going to do wonders for your business, no matter what you’re needing the server for. You need to go through the action of operating system comparison, because it will help you gather a greater understanding of the two choices. There is one choice that needs to be tackled no matter what, and that’s what kind of operating system you’re going to be running the server on. Some people prefer one over the other, and some people aren’t going to care what the operating system is (which is kind of careless), but in the end of it all the decision has to be made. There are various features for each system, and obviously going through these features will help you choose between the two. Having the best choice out there when it comes to Windows developing and framework support is going to save you tons of trouble, as most of us know things aren’t always going to go smoothly in this industry.

The easiest thing to compare would be low-memory usage, because Windows Server 2012 is way better in that regard. Seeing as it’s the “newer version” most people would tell you that Windows Server 2012 is where you need to get started, but most of us don’t want to break the bank when we’re putting together our Windows VPS. Getting into a cheap Windows VPS isn’t that hard, all you need to be aware of is the differences between the two (although those who don’t have a lot of budget money to work with will more than likely stick with Windows Server 2008). Both operating systems have the ability to operate on 750 Mb, which means smaller servers still have a purpose in that right for both operating systems.

Hypervisor-dynamic enabled memory is another one of the fantastic traits Windows Server 2012 makes use of, and of course Windows Server 2008 doesn’t offer this particular selection. Paging out data to the disk is much easier in Windows Server 2012 too, so that’s another point to chalk up for the new era of the product. When you’re choosing which operating system you want to pretty much base your VPS off of you need to know what you’re talking about. Even if you aren’t an expert on the subject there are blogs (exactly like this one) out there that are going to help you with anything (and everything) you’ll need to know about. The best VPS server is only going to be as good as the operating system it uses and the team of workers that keeps everything running, everything else is simply “extra” (respectively of course, everything plays an important role in one way or another). The operating system is a key portion of the entire VPS platform being able to do what it does, but the physical elements (like SSD drives and such) are another aspect you should look into.